Friday, May 17, 2019

Four Remaining Veto Requests of Governor DeSantis

Sierra Club Florida has four remaining veto requests of Governor DeSantis.  These four requests cover threats that both directly and indirectly impact the natural environment upon which we depend, freedom of speech, and the state of our democracy:

Property Development: Amended in the waning hours of the legislative session, HB 7103 turns the growth management law upside down by requiring comprehensive plan amendments to conform to pre-existing development orders, and requiring costs be paid to the prevailing party in challenges to development orders.  This will have a chilling effect on citizen enforcement of comprehensive plans. See letter here:  

Attorney Fees and Costs – HB 829 provides that fees and costs will always be granted to the prevailing party in a challenge involving an ordinance that is ‘’expressly preempted by the State Constitution or by state law.” Even if the preemption is expressed, the scope of the preemption  may legitimately be in doubt – exactly the sort of disagreement the courts are designed to settle. The risk of being assessed the local government’s fees and costs may be chilling for regular citizens challenging an ordinance, but not necessarily for a developer or other large landholder. Legal fees are a cost of doing business. The bill attempts to coerce localities to cave to any challenge they are not absolutely sure they are going to win. This bill is actually unnecessary, as Florida Statute already provides for awarding costs to victims of unscrupulous or frivolous suits. Additionally, a newly added Section 2 of the bill adds an implicit preemption of the local regulation of biosolids that would begin on the effective date of the FL Department of Environmental Protection regulation of same. See letter here:  

Voting Rights Restoration: When other bills failed, SB 7066 was amended with the restoration of rights (Amendment 4) languageThe legislation will harm all returning citizens who have prior felony convictions but have completed all but the financial obligations of their sentences by rendering them ineligible to vote. See letter here: 

Constitutional Amendments: HB 5 was amended late in the session to include the citizens' initiative petition gatherers language which will make it harder for citizen initiatives to get on the ballot. The bill makes it illegal to pay petition gatherers based on the number of petitions they collect, requires submission of information about petition gatherers, including their permanent and temporary addresses, and would require the gatherers to sign sworn statements that they will follow state laws and rules. The bill would also require petitions to be turned into county supervisors of elections no more than 30 days after being signed by voters, and includes penalties of up to $50 for each late submission. Fines could grow to $1,000 for any petition “willfully” not submitted on time. See letter here: http://www.sierraclubfloridanews.org/2019/05/sierra-club-florida-asks-governor.html


SIERRA CLUB RESPONDS TO SIGNING OF “TOLL ROADS TO NOWHERE” BILL BY GOVERNOR DESANTIS (PRESS RELEASE)


For Immediate Release                                            
May 17, 2019                                     
Contact:
Frank Jackalone, 727-824-8813, EXT. 302, 727-804-1317 (c), frank.jackalone@sierraclub.org
Tim Martin, 727-251-9979 timothymartin@suncoastsierra.org
Deborah Foote, 850-727-4039 (office), 251-533-1798 (c), deborah.foote@sierraclub.org


**PRESS RELEASE**

SIERRA CLUB RESPONDS TO SIGNING OF “TOLL ROADS TO NOWHERE” BILL BY GOVERNOR DESANTIS
Will destroy much of Florida’s remaining natural and rural areas

TALLAHASSEE, FL. (May 17, 2019) –
Governor Ron DeSantis today signed into law SB 7068, also known as the Toll Roads to Nowhere Bill.  In response, Sierra Club Florida issued the following statements:

Statement of Tim Martin, Sierra Club Florida Conservation Chair
Sierra Club Florida is deeply disappointed that Governor DeSantis has chosen to destroy much of Florida’s remaining natural and rural areas to build unnecessary and costly toll roads that won’t meet Florida’s true transportation needs. By ignoring the recommendations of the I- 75 Relief Task Force, the Governor’s decision to build the “roads to nowhere” will do nothing to address congestion in urban areas, and funding to support these new toll roads will be prioritized over other necessary transportation projects.”

“By building these toll roads, Florida stands to lose critical habitat for Florida panthers and black bears; protected lands and wildlife corridors risk being fragmented; and the roads and resultant development are likely to increase pollution - impacting Florida’s rivers and springs and increasing red tide and blue green algae outbreaks. Funding to plan for these toll roads will be diverted from general revenue, removing hundreds of millions of dollars from other critical areas such as education, healthcare, and the environment.”

“This decision will haunt the Governor. Every time he claims to be pro-environment going forward we will be forced to remind people of how, when faced with the biggest environmental decision in decades, he chose to side with wealthy landowners and industry interests. Teddy Roosevelt is probably rolling in his grave right now that a comparison was ever made between him and Governor DeSantis.”  

Statement of Frank Jackalone, Sierra Club Florida Chapter Director:
“Governor DeSantis failed the people of Florida and our natural environment today. He signed a bill that would spend billions of taxpayer dollars to build 320 miles of toll roads traversing Florida’s pristine nature coast and rural heartland.  These roads are a gift to developers who want to convert hundreds of thousands of acres of forests, wetlands, and ranches into new cities, towns and subdivisions.”

“Ron DeSantis proved that he’s no Teddy Roosevelt.  During the Session, he stood by idly while the Legislature slashed funding for the Florida Forever Program and provided no funding for the Rural Lands Protection Program - disregarding the mandate of Florida’s voters set by Amendment One in 2014 to acquire and protect important conservation lands.  DeSantis also remained silent when Senate President Bill Galvano bullied the Legislature to accept his poorly thought out Toll Roads to Nowhere plan without even getting input from the Governor’s own staff at the Department of Transportation and the Department of Environmental Protection.  Instead of heeding the strong concerns of environmental and community leaders, Governor DeSantis caved into pressure from Galvano and wealthy business interests that stand to profit from the three toll roads and the massive development that will accompany them.”

“It is a false narrative that building toll roads means economic development in rural areas. One only needs to look at I-10 between Tallahassee and Pensacola to see that it doesn’t happen. What will come is sprawl, local businesses replaced with gas stations, fast food restaurants and chain stores surrounding toll road interchanges, and the deterioration of robust downtowns due to being bypassed by the toll roads.”

“Sierra Club Florida will take every action in our power to prevent the construction of the three toll roads. We will join together and assist residents of communities whose homes, businesses and rural way of life will be threatened by these destructive roads. We will unite with taxpayers who don’t want to assume the costs of unneeded toll roads, and we will work with urban residents whose infrastructure and transit needs are being ignored by the State. We will go to court, demand a rehearing by the Legislature, and hold elected officials accountable for voting for this ruinous plan.”


State Senate President Galvano pats Governor DeSantis on the back at the signing ceremony for Toll Roads Bill.  Source: Florida Politics

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Thursday, May 16, 2019

Sierra Club Letter to Governor DeSantis Requesting Veto of SB 7066


May 10, 2019

The Honorable Ron DeSantis, Governor
Plaza Level 1, The Capitol
400 South Monroe Street
Tallahassee, FL 32399-0001

Dear Governor DeSantis:

Sierra Club Florida urges you to veto Senate Bill 7066 titled “Election Administration.” 
Passed by nearly 65 percent of voters last fall, Amendment 4 was supposed to automatically restore the voting rights of former felons who completed their sentences except for those convicted of murder or a felony sexual offense. SB 7066 will require former felons to repay all restitution along with all court-ordered fees and fines before regaining their voting rights. The legislation does allow for financial obligations to be considered completed if a victim or court forgives the restitution, or a judge allows community service in lieu of payment.
We believe that the legislature has violated the spirit of what voters supported by making a person’s voting rights dependent on how much money they can afford to pay and this requirement will have a disparate impact on a group that is disproportionately black and may lack employment or large incomes. Amendment 4 does not need clarification, and lawmakers are merely attempting to undermine one of the biggest voting rights expansions in decades.
SB 7066 also will create an extra burden on Florida’s court system. There is no single entity responsible for tracking fines, fees, and restitution, which makes it unclear how people will be kept updated on the total amount they must repay, or how local elections officials will track who can and cannot register. Additionally, it doesn’t contain any information on how courts should handle the influx of people seeking to have financial obligations dismissed or converted to community service.
SB 7066 is a step backward for efforts to reintegrate people with felony records into local communities and we strongly urge you to veto this legislation.

Sincerely,

Deborah L. Foote
Government Affairs and Political Director

Sierra Club Letter to Governor DeSantis Requesting Veto of House Bill 5


May 10, 2019

The Honorable Ron DeSantis, Governor
Plaza Level 1, The Capitol
400 South Monroe Street
Tallahassee, FL 32399-0001

Dear Governor DeSantis:

Sierra Club Florida urges you to veto House Bill 5 titled “Ballot Measures.” 

Tacked onto a bill in the waning hours of the last full day of the legislative session, the adopted amendment circumvented the legislative process. Specifically, the House added the petition-gathering restrictions to HB 5 which was focused on local sales taxes and sent it to the Senate. The Senate then approved it, though a separate bill that included petition-gathering restrictions failed to make it through the Senate committee process during the session. 

The petition-gathering process plays a crucial role in placing citizens’ initiatives on the ballot. The
legislation makes it more cumbersome and expensive to collect the petitions necessary to gain access to the ballot by:
  • making it illegal to pay petition gatherers based on the number of petitions they collect;
  • requiring all paid petition gatherers to register with the Department of State including provision of their permanent and temporary addresses, and requiring the gatherers to sign sworn statements that they will follow state laws and rules; and
  • requiring petitions to be turned into county supervisors of elections no more than 30 days after being signed by voters and includes penalties of up to $50 for each late submission- growing to $1,000 for any petition “willfully” not submitted on time.

There also are changes to ballot language. Specifically, the ballot would have to name the initiative’s sponsor, state how many out-of-state petition gatherers were used, describe the percentage of money raised for the initiative from Floridians, and provide a statement in BOLD regarding the economic impact of local and state government.

Sincerely,

Deborah L. Foote
Government Affairs and Political Director

Sierra Club Letter to Governor DeSantis- Veto House Bill 829


May 16, 2019

The Honorable Ron DeSantis
Plaza Level 1, The Capitol
400 S. Monroe St.
Tallahassee, FL 32399-0001

Dear Governor DeSantis:

Sierra Club Florida urges you to veto House Bill 829, titled “Attorney Fees and Costs.”
HB 829 is an attempt by the legislature to coerce local governments into acceding to more preemption than may be supported by statutory text by increasing the financial risk of going to court to defend an ordinance challenged on the grounds that it is expressly preempted. In addition, section 2 of the bill (ll. 52-59) makes clear the legislature’s intent to preempt regulation of Class B biosolids in a one-size-fits-all fashion. This is inappropriate in water quality issues which should be addressed on a watershed by watershed basis.

Specifically, the bill would:

1)      Use the threat of awarding the prevailing party attorney fees and costs to coerce local governments into acceding to broader constitutional or statutory preemptions than may actually exist in law. HB 829 would impose these expenses on non-prevailing parties even if initial presentations to the court were good faith arguments regarding whether the scope of an express preemption extended to the subject of a local ordinance, and if the arguments were made with a reasonable expectation of success. A general exemption from monetary sanctions for good faith behavior already exists in 57.105 (3)(a) F.S. The basis for this exemption is to allow the judicial system to operate in a way that reserves sanctions for malfeasance, not for having a weaker argument.

The party challenging an ordinance gets an initial advantage from the pressure on the local government to withdraw or repeal its ordinance before the court process is completed and costs can be awarded.  The challenger though, is at the same or greater risk should the local government successfully follow through on defending the legitimacy of its ordinance since the challenger will then be on the hook for the local government’s fees and costs in addition to his or her own.

Neither party can control what the other’s fees and costs will be. This serves to discourage both parties from entering the legal arena to challenge or defend. The inability to budget within one’s means is a strong disincentive to participation in a challenge or defense of an ordinance.

The legislature’s power is wrongly increased whenever a dubious claim of preemption goes unchallenged and law is not clarified because of an indefensible disincentive to accessing the judiciary. General laws are written to apply to the state as a whole and interpretation is often necessary. Local governments and their constituencies should not suffer diminished autonomy because the legislature chooses to make court action prohibitively risky. 
2)      Apply the disincentive of awarded fees and costs to local governments’ environmental ordinances.  Subsection (5) of HB 829 exempts local ordinances adopted pursuant to Part II of Chapter 163 (Growth Management issues), the Florida Building Code, and the Florida Fire Prevention Code.  However, a review of those statutes reveals that there is nothing in any of them that deal with invasive or exotic species.  Accordingly, an express preemption of regulations dealing with invasives to the state would be subject to the fees and costs provisions of this bill which could weaken or halt a locality’s attempts to get ahead of a serious threat in a timely manner.  Even more disturbingly, section 2 of the bill makes clear the legislature’s intent to preempt local control of the management of land application of Class B biosolids.  The relevant text of the bill reads:

A municipality or county may continue to enforce or extend an ordinance, regulation, resolution, rule, moratorium, or policy adopted before February 1, 2019, relating to the land application of Class B biosolids until the ordinance, regulation, resolution, rule, moratorium, or policy is repealed by the municipality or county or until the effective date of the rules adopted by the Department of Environmental Protection, whichever occurs first.

This text indicates an implied preemption that has a number of negative aspects:
·         The intended preemption is clearly implied as beginning on the effective date of rules adopted by the Department of Environmental Protection. The preemption is to be complete; no more stringent regulation will be permitted.  Residents of communities are the ones who have to live with water pollution and must be able to adopt regulations strong enough to do the job of protecting their water resources.  Also, it is the local community that is on the hook for violations of the Clean Water Act, not the State.  Localities must be able to adopt regulations, up to and including bans, that work effectively and must not be saddled with a halfway measure that a statewide regulation is very likely to be. Section 2 of the bill exempts growth management ordinances from the costs and fees provisions of HB 829, but it decidedly does not exempt them from preemption as this portion of the bill illustrates.
·         Water quality regulation should be done on a watershed by watershed basis as soils, vegetation, impermeable surfaces, and sources of pollution vary throughout Florida.
·         The implied preemption in section 2 of the bill contravenes of 163.3162 (3) (h) which currently states that ordinances regulating “the transportation or land application of domestic wastewater residuals or other forms of sewage sludge shall not be deemed to be duplication of regulation.”

We urge you to exercise your authority to veto HB 829 in order to maintain access to the courts, to reserve the use of monetary sanctions for malfeasance as already established in Chapter 57 of the Florida Statutes, to allow challengers and local governments to make rational choices regarding how to control their costs in budgeting for legal actions, and to indicate your disapproval of preempting effective local environmental ordinances.

Sincerely,

Deborah L. Foote
Government Affairs & Political Director

Tuesday, May 14, 2019

Sierra Club Letter to Governor Ron DeSantis: Veto HB 7103


May 14, 2019

The Honorable Ron DeSantis
Plaza Level, The Capitol
400 S. Monroe St.
Tallahassee, FL 32399-0001

RE: House Bill 7103

Dear Governor DeSantis:

Sierra Club Florida urges you to veto HB 7103, titled “Community Development and Housing.”

HB 7103 threatens Florida with a proliferation of sprawl by effectively eliminating the only means of enforcing comprehensive plans, and is unnecessary in light of statutory sanctions for improper or baseless legal actions.

Specifically the bill would:

1) Threaten Florida with a proliferation of sprawl by making challenges to development orders a potential financial catastrophe for the citizens the law relies on for enforcement.  HB 7103 requires the court to award costs and fees to the prevailing party.  Since the parties in such a proceeding are necessarily a local government and an “aggrieved or adversely affected party,” there is a clear imbalance in the resources available to each.  As noted in the legislative findings in 57.111(2) F.S.:

The Legislature finds that certain persons may be deterred from seeking review of, or defending against, unreasonable governmental action because of the expense of civil actions and administrative proceedings. Because of the greater resources of the state, the standard for an award of attorney’s fees and costs against the state should be different from the standard for an award against a private litigant. The purpose of this section is to diminish the deterrent effect of seeking review of, or defending against, governmental action by providing in certain situations an award of attorney’s fees and costs against the state.

HB 7103 makes no such accommodation for the differences between citizens and local governments because its purpose is to intimidate citizen action against development orders inconsistent with local comprehensive plans.

The only bulwark against violations of an adopted comprehensive plan is citizen action; Florida Statutes provide no other mechanism.  The fees and costs provision makes the choice to challenge the approval of a development order equivalent to deliberately choosing to risk bankruptcy. 
Accordingly, it is clear that few, if any, such challenges will be mounted if this bill becomes law.  The result will be the end of growth management in Florida. Land use will become a race to the bottom, and residents will be doomed to increased costs due to inefficient design and planning that only increase with time. Pollution from runoff and unnecessary automobile use will increase, and Floridians will see a decreased quality of life.  Florida has seen this before. It is why the Growth Management Act was adopted in the first place.

2) The punitive fees and costs provision of HB 7103 is unnecessary to prevent improper or baseless legal actions or those designed only to cause delay.  There are already numerous provisions in statute that deal with awards of costs and fees, and in many cases these awards are sanctions for wasting the time of the court or for using the courts to harass another party. Chapter 57 of the Florida Statutes is devoted to costs and fees. 57.105 F.S. provides that costs and fees are to be awarded if a claim or defense is made that is not supported by material facts or would not be supported by the application of then-existing law to those material facts. Costs and fees also are awarded if a legal action is shown to be designed to cause unreasonable delay. And subsection (6) of 163.3215, the very section of law amended in HB 7103, provides:

The signature of an attorney or party constitutes a certificate that he or she has read the pleading, motion, or other paper and that, to the best of his or her knowledge, information, and belief formed after reasonable inquiry, it is not interposed for any improper purpose, such as to harass or to cause unnecessary delay or for economic advantage, competitive reasons or frivolous purposes or needless increase in the cost of litigation. If a pleading, motion, or other paper is signed in violation of these requirements, the court, upon motion or its own initiative, shall impose upon the person who signed it, a represented party, or both, an appropriate sanction, which may include an order to pay to the other party or parties the amount of reasonable expenses incurred because of the filing of the pleading, motion, or other paper, including a reasonable attorney’s fee.

There can be no reason to institute the fees and costs provision of HB 7103 other than to intimidate by the threat of penury aggrieved or adversely affected citizens who would otherwise come forward to challenge a development order that is inconsistent with a local comprehensive plan. 

We urge you to recognize that unenforceable laws protect no one, to protect the viability of growth management in Florida for the State’s residents and the communities where they choose to live, and to defend the right of citizens to go to court to call their government to account without having to literally ‘bet the farm’ on the outcome. We strongly urge you to veto HB 7103.

Sincerely,

Deborah L. Foote
Government Affairs & Political Director


Friday, May 10, 2019

Governor DeSantis Vetoes Moratorium on Local Government Plastic Straw Regulation

In a statement released late Friday afternoon, Governor DeSantis vetoed House Bill 771, which includes a moratorium on the local regulation of single-use plastic straws until 2024. Citing municipalities that have enacted ordinances prohibiting single-use plastic straws, the Governor stated in his veto letter that "these measures have not, as far as I can tell, frustrated any state policy or harmed the state's interest." He continues that "the State should simply allow local communities to address this issue through the political process."

Sierra Club Florida actively opposed all legislation seeking to preempt local regulation of plastic straws citing concerns that many marine animals mistake these and other plastic items for food, and that in a survey of beach cleanups by the Ocean Conservancy, straws came in as the seventh most common type of beach trash; coastal areas are the entry points for plastics to enter the ocean and tributaries.
 

The Sierra Club applauds Governor DeSantis' and will work to assure the legislature does not override Governor DeSantis' veto. 

Wednesday, May 8, 2019

South Miami Becomes Eighth Florida City Committed 100% Clean and Renewable Energy


On the evening of May 7, 2019, South Miami residents and Sierra Club Miami volunteers gathered at South Miami City Hall to support and celebrate the City’s commitment to 100% clean and renewable energy community-wide by 2040. The City Commission of South Miami unanimously passed a resolution committing the City to transition by 2040 with a timeline and milestones for implementation. The resolution emphasizes a just and equitable transition to 100 percent clean energy, and includes a commitment for the city to work with community stakeholders to implement its goal.  The City will begin a planning process with community members in the coming months, and hopes for widespread participation.
 
Sierra Club Miami volunteers gather at City Hall to show support.
South Miami has a history of environmental leadership, from committing to carbon neutral municipal operations, participating in the creation of the Green Corridor PACE financing district, and leading Solar United Neighbors of Florida to expand solar purchasing cooperatives into South Florida. Recently, the City became the first municipality outside of California to require all new construction include solar energy systems.

“South Miami's new commitment to a 100 percent clean and renewable energy supply community-wide is the natural extension of our history of commitment to the planet, our children, and the natural world. Now we have roll up our sleeves, fill out our budget, and move this commitment from paper to reality. We invite our neighboring municipalities to join us in transforming our economy and infrastructure to a more sustainable way of life," said South Miami Mayor Phil Stoddard.

With this resolution, South Miami became the first city in south Florida, the 122nd city in the U.S., and the eighth city in a growing group of Florida cities that includes Dunedin, Gainesville, Largo, Orlando, St. Petersburg, Sarasota, and Tallahassee to commit to this goal. Sierra Club Miami Group and Ready for 100 volunteers had been working with the City of South Miami and their Green Task Force on a 100% renewable energy supply for the last year.  After a series of resident interviews, community meetings, and townhall events, volunteers worked with the Green Task Force to write a timeline and implementation plan.  In the weekend preceding the vote, 252 petition signatures poured in and the City Commission to accelerated their transition timeline from 2050 to 2040!  In addition, the City has also begun taking steps on their commitment to carbon neutral transportation. This month, staff began taking steps to implement their transition plan, known as the Intermodal Transportation Plan, including developing their first federal grant request for electric buses.

“Communities across Florida know firsthand what the climate crisis means for our future. To build healthier, resilient, and strong communities and local economies, we need to focus on our contributions to a global issue that will touch families in our community and across the world. Congratulations to South Miami for leading the way locally -- the Sierra Club looks forward to working with the City to implement its vision for 100 percent clean, renewable energy. In the Sunshine State, solar can be our ticket to powering forward a better future for all,” said Noel Cleland, Political Committee Chair of the Florida Sierra Club Miami Group.

Sierra Club Florida congratulates Miami Group, City of South Miami and Ready for 100 volunteers on this success, and looks forward to the start of the community-planning process! Big thanks also to the local solar homeowners for their time and support! Learn more about how they went solar and saved at Solar United Neighbors.  #CleanEnergyForAll #Readyfor100Action

Monday, May 6, 2019

Sierra Club's hand-delivered letter to Governor DeSantis asking him to veto Toll Roads to Nowhere Bill (SB 7068)


Dear Governor DeSantis:
On behalf of 230,000 members and supporters, Sierra Club Florida asks that you veto SB 7068, which would construct three toll roads through the heartland of Florida. We have carefully watched the debate and wish to bring your attention a number of areas of importance.
While supporters claim the three corridors have been “well vetted,” the reality is that the FDOT Interstate 75 Relief Task Force recommended in 2016 that rather than new roads, a better approach was expanding the vehicle capacity of the interstate and connecting highways. Why would the State create three new task forces to look at building new roads when that option was not recommended?
Some have characterized SB 7068 as a “study.” The legislation is clearly not, and, should this bill become law, the only thing that comes back to the legislature for approval are appropriations to fund the Multi—use Corridors of Regional Economic Significance (MCORES). It also does not contemplate, as some have claimed, all types of transportation, including light rail and airports; the legislation specifically states the project undertaken to be tolled roads.
Funding for SB 7068 comes from redirecting, not returning, general revenues to the Transportation Trust fund. The 2009 motor vehicle fee increases went directly into general revenues to make up for shortfall due to the recession- they were never part of the Transportation Trust Fund.  This legislation permanently redirects these general revenues to the Transportation Trust fund, letting FDOT decide how to use them, and shorting other programs these needed revenues.
We have serious concerns about the ability of rural toll roads to generate adequate revenues. For example, the FDOT estimate of toll revenues for the original Suncoast Parkway (which allowed it to be built under the 12- 30 year rule) was estimated to be $150 million by 2014 and in reality came in at $22 million. The revenue estimate for 2019 is just shy of $30 million. Then, if the toll revenues for MCORES are not sufficient to support the toll roads, funding will be taken from revenues of the Florida Turnpike Enterprise, which receives tolls collected from all of Florida’s toll roads. Today the state of Florida heavily subsidizes the Suncoast Parkway with funds from other toll roads. Capacity in our congested areas needs to be addressed but potential funding, in all likelihood, will be used to support these proposed toll roads instead of addressing backlogged infrastructure needs.
Supporters claim FDOT will follow the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) guidelines. NEPA requires Federal Agencies to assess the environmental effects of their proposed actions prior to making decisions. FDOT is only required to follow NEPA when federal funding is used for construction. There is no indication in the legislation or statements of sponsors that federal dollars will be used or that NEPA will be adhered to.
The bill’s sponsors often cited hurricane evacuation as an impetus for this bill, but Florida’s own emergency management website urges people to “select an evacuation destination that is nearest to your home, preferably in the same county.” The money spent on these tollways could be better spent shoring up local shelters so that Floridians can heed the state’s advice. We know that only 42% of schools meet the requirements to be used as a shelter. Funds should be directed to provide safe sheltering opportunities throughout the state, not forcing them to evacuate on congested roads.
We are hopeful that you, who stated that you are sensitive to the cost of toll roads on average Floridians, will veto this bill.  We haven’t forgotten the words of candidate DeSantis at a campaign stop in the Everglades on September 12, 2018:  “I represent, maybe, an emergence of a Teddy Roosevelt-style Republican Party here in Florida." Teddy Roosevelt used his Presidential authority to establish 150 national forests, 51 federal bird reserves, four national game preserves, five national parks and 18 national monuments on over 230 million acres of public land. Vetoing this bill will demonstrate that you honor your commitments and begin to walk in Roosevelt’s shoes.

Sincerely,
Alyssa Cadwalader                                                      Frank Jackalone                      
Chapter Chair                                                              Chapter Director



Wednesday, May 1, 2019

Sierra Club Florida Response to Passage of Toll Roads to Nowhere Bill


photo

For Immediate Release                                                                                 May 1, 2019

Contact: Frank Jackalone, frank.jackalone@sierraclub.org, 727-804-1317

Toll Roads to Nowhere Bill – A Declaration of War on Florida’s Environment
It is now up to Governor DeSantis to save taxpayers, farms, and natural Florida

Tallahassee, FL – The Florida House of Representatives today voted approval of the Florida Toll Expressways Bill, aka the Toll Roads to Nowhere Bill, (SB 7068).  In response, Sierra Club Florida released a statement and a fact sheet titled “In Response to Evasion, Spin, & Ignorance on the Toll Roads Legislation” that debunks the fallacious and misleading arguments made on the House floor by bill sponsors.

Statement of Frank Jackalone, Sierra Club Florida Chapter Director and Timothy Martin, Sierra Club Florida Chapter Conservation Chair

Today the Republican majority of the Florida House of Representatives approved a disastrous Toll Roads to Nowhere Bill that would be ruinous to the rural heartland of Florida and our state’s nature coast.  The urban sprawl that would accompany the new toll roads would be deadly, devouring hundreds of thousands of acres of rural and natural lands, fragmenting wildlife habitat and polluting our rivers, springs, lakes and coastal waters.
  
Passage of the Toll Roads to Nowhere Bill is the equivalent of a declaration of war by the Legislature on Florida’s Environment, and it moves Sierra Club to respond in kind.  It is the worst bill for Florida’s environment we have seen in more than 20 years.

Florida taxpayers will pay over $1 billion for these needless roads over the next decade. Money that could be spent on relieving our actual highway congestion issues will now instead be funneled into 320 miles of toll roads that will create massive sprawl and traffic.  It's a perversion of the old tax and spend analogy, taking tax money from hard working Floridians to give away to developers and landowners.  In return they will pave over our rural and natural areas to line their own pockets with profits.
The Toll Roads to Nowhere bill is largely a pet project of one legislator, Senate President Bill Galvano.   Galvano used his extraordinary powers over the state budget and bills sponsored by each Senator, to pressure his colleagues to approve the bill whether they liked it or not.   He then did some horse-trading with Republican leadership of the Florida House of Representatives to make sure his bill would be passed there.  In short, this one man imposed his will on the Senate, and then maneuvered House Republicans to vote for this terrible bill.  Sierra Club is grateful to Representatives Evan Jenne, Margaret Good and 34 other House Democrats who refused to be intimidated and voted against the bill.

We join today with more than 90 other environmental organizations, citizens groups, and businesses to urge Governor DeSantis to veto the Toll Roads to Nowhere Bill.  The Governor should ask Legislators to take a second look at this concept next year and broaden it into a study on how to manage Florida’s growth, stop harmful pollution, transition to clean, renewable energy, and meet the Sunshine State’s transportation needs over the next several decades. 

We are hopeful that Governor DeSantis, who has stated that he is sensitive to the cost of toll roads on average Floridians, will recognize the bill as an affront to fiscal conservatism and veto it.  And we haven’t forgotten that candidate DeSantis promised at a campaign stop in the Everglades on September 12, 2018, that he would “represent, maybe, an emergence of a Teddy Roosevelt-style Republican Party here in Florida."  We remind the Governor that Roosevelt used his Presidential authority to establish 150 national forests, 51 federal bird reserves, four national game preserves, five national parks and 18 national monuments on over 230 million acres of public land; that’s quite a contrast to a Florida Legislature that just this year slashed spending for the Florida Forever program and passed a bill that would destroy much of the state’s rural and natural lands. 
Should Governor DeSantis sign the Toll Roads to Nowhere Bill, Sierra Club will mobilize our resources to stop construction of the ruinous roads.  We will organize opposition in impacted rural communities; activate more than 230,000 members and supporters in Florida; go to court to stop destruction of our natural lands; and hold accountable legislators who voted for the bill in the next election.

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In Response to Evasion, Spin, & Ignorance on the Toll Roads Legislation
·       While supporters claim the three corridors have been “well vetted”, the reality is that the FDOT Interstate 75 Relief Task Force[1] recommended in 2016 that rather than new roads, a better approach was expanding the vehicle capacity of the interstate and connecting highways.
·       Once this bill becomes law the only thing that comes back to the legislature for approval are appropriations to fund the Multi—use Corridors of Regional Economic Significance (MCORES)
·       The 2009 motor vehicle fee increases went directly into general revenues to make up for shortfall due to the recession- they were never part of the Transportation Trust Fund.  This legislation permanently redirects these general revenues to the Transportation Trust fund, letting FDOT decide how to use them, and shorting programs like education and health care these needed revenues.
·       Supporters claim that MCORES contemplates all types of transportation, including light rail and airports; however the legislation specifically states the project undertaken to be tolled roads.[2]
·       The FDOT estimate of toll revenues for the original Suncoast Parkway (which allowed it to be built under the 12- 30 year rule[3]) was estimated to be $150 million by 2014 and in reality came in at $22 million.  The revenue estimate for 2019 is just shy of $30 million. [4]
·       If the toll revenues for MCORES are not sufficient to support the toll roads, funding will be taken from revenues of the Florida Turnpike Enterprise, which receives tolls collected from all of Florida’s toll roads.[5] Today the state of Florida heavily subsidizes the Suncoast Parkway with funds from other toll roads.
·       What if the Florida Turnpike Connector (to the Suncoast Parkway extension) is not approved for construction but the Southwest-Central Florida Connector is? Will people simply be dumped on to I-4?
·       FDOT is not obligated to accept the recommendations of the three task forces and local officials who review the proposed corridors.
·       Supporters claim FDOT will follow the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) guidelines. NEPA requires Federal Agencies to assess the environmental effects of their proposed actions prior to making decisions.[6] FDOT is only required to follow NEPA when federal funding is used for construction. There is no indication in the legislation or statements of sponsors that federal dollars will be used or NEPA will be adhered to.
·       The bill’s sponsors often cited hurricane evacuation as an impetus for this bill, but the State’s own emergency management website urges people to “select an evacuation destination that is nearest to your home, preferably in the same county.” The money they want to spend on these tollways could be better spent shoring up local shelters so that Floridians can heed the state’s advice. 



[2] Lines 168-171 SB 7068
[3] For a proposed turnpike project, that, as determined by the department before the issuance of revenue bonds for the project, the estimated net revenues of the proposed turnpike project, excluding feeder roads and turnpike improvements, will be sufficient to pay at least 50 percent of the annual debt service on the bonds associated with the project by the end of the 12th year of operation and to pay at least 100 percent of the debt service on the bonds by the end of the 30th year of operation. In implementing this paragraph, up to 50 percent of the adopted work program costs of the project may be funded from turnpike revenues. FS 338.221(8)(a)
[5] Lines 275-285 SB 7068